Tag Archive | Games

Eat, play, laugh

walking tall

Tomorrow is Thanksgiving, at least for Americans, and this it the final post of this series. I’ve covered a few different topics gratitude, compassion, awe, but before you sit down tomorrow with significant (and insignificant) others, to eat yourself silly, I thought I’d tackle some seemingly “less adult” themes that might help to make your holiday weekend happier.

A fellow told me he was going to sky-diving school. He said, ‘I’ve been going for three months.’

I said, ‘How many successful jumps do you need to make before you graduate?’

He said, ‘All of them.’

How many times did you laugh in the last week? I hope a lot.  You probably didn’t laugh 300 times a day (the normal rate for a child. Adults average around 17 times). So there’s room for improvement.

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Laughter is great for the abs and it gets a lot of oxygen into the lungs, which makes you feel better.  Scientific study is showing that laughter really fundamentally helps you to lead a happier life. So making it a point to try and see the funny side of things is going to be good for you, and everyone your with.

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Humor can also stop a lot of arguments cold. At Thanksgiving especially, it pays to know some jokes or stories, even if they aren’t your own. Here’s true one that’s timely.

A Tennessee woman entered into a prolonged, fraught stand-off with a wild turkey that was blocking her car in her driveway.

She tried shouting at the turkey, charging it with her vehicle and also coaxing it out of her way by feeding it a raspberry, but ultimately conceded, “I’m not a wild turkey, so I really have no idea what a raspberry means to a turkey.”

In the end, she was able to scare the turkey away by hurling a frozen turkey at it.

Try to remember some embarrassing things that happened to you over the last year. They’re probably weren’t funny at the time. But now, in retrospect, they might be hilarious. And not just to yourself.

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Even chimps suffer embarrassing moments

Research has show that telling embarrassing stories about ourselves actually makes people like and trust us more. So, get your family and friends around the table to tell their tale and have a good laugh. Rebuild some bridges — through humor.

Good judgment comes from experience, and a lot of that comes from bad judgment. — Will Rodgers

Another thing that really helps buoy the mood during group-oriented holidays is play. Play is not just a button on a device.

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Play involves fun, others, and usually the joy that is “mistakes.” It’s something adults don’t do a lot of anymore. Adults tend to watch sports for example, but they don’t play them.

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This guy has play

 

Getting outside, running around playing flag football, or raking and then leaping into leaf piles, or going apple picking, try some serious bird watching, or leaf peeping while showing off your ugly sweater…

Yes, that means all at once!

gets the endorphins up and builds a group spirit.

If you’re stuck inside, light some candles, build a fire, make some hot cider, toast some pumpkin seeds for that long walk in the woods

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and make some pine cone bird feeders to take with you and hang, or break out the traditional actual board,  board games.

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In short, have some fun. Actual physical fun. Don’t worry social media and virtual reality will still be there when you get back.

If you can’t get your teenagers away from their devices, send them to The Purpose Challenge.   There they’ll find a Tool Kin with 4 days (perfect for Thanksgiving weekend) of short but interesting and thoughtful activities designed to help high school students figure out their purpose. (Other than just annoy you)

It helps get them pointed in the direction they may not know they want to go, and figure out what steps to take to be successful and happy their own way, in their own life. It will also give them something to talk about with you! It’s also worth $5,000 – $25000 in prize money for college if you’re a student graduating high school in 2018.

purpose

A Tolkien of My Affection

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I like to play this game (which I invented) with friends and lovers. It’s called Tolkien of My Affection. To play you’ve had to have read Tolkien (not just watched the movies), so you’re up on all the characters. But beyond that, it’s pretty simple. Recently I played this with Fling while at a cafe.

It consists of two questions.

  1. Which character is (the person your playing with)?
  2. Which character are you?

After you type your answers, you simultaneously text each other those answers. Then you explain why you chose each character.

My answers were Narsil and Isildur.

  • Fling is very much the man who cut the ring from Sauron’s hand and paid for it. (Though I like to think he’s currently being reforged).
  • I, alas, am very much the person who can do great things, but never the one small most important of all things.

Fling’s answers were Bill the Pony and Samwise Gamgee.

  • Fling said I’m brave, but I’ve been with bad men. Yet I’m wiser now and in good company with someone who cares and would not drag anyone into needless danger.
  • He sees himself as dependable, down to earth, closest of companions, and occasional protector. A through thick and thin, to hell and back sort of guy.

I have to say Fling’s answers were a bit worrisome. Sam turned Bill loose at the Gates of Moria. True, they were reunited, but . . . . Are the Gates of Moria on our horizon?

Tolkien of My Affection is a dangerous game. On the surface of it, the object is simply to understand the other person and yourself a little better. However, very often you find out a lot about yourself, and the other person, and what sort of relationship you think you have with them and they think they have with you.

You know, like, why did both Fling and I see ourselves as humanish creatures (semi-elvish royalty; rude hobbit) but each other as non-humanish creatures (magical sword; intelligent pony).  Why did each of us see the other as something subject to our power: Isildur owns and uses Narsil, Sam owns and uses Bill. What does this say about us as individuals? About our relationship?

This game is a bit like the Ring itself. Once you pick it up, you can’t stop playing with it. So if you haven’t picked it up, For Galadriel’s sake don’t. It will drive you mad.